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More than 30 years ago, Johnnie Haire, grounds supervisor at Sunset Gardens of Memory cemetery in Millstadt, Illinois, set up a birdbath and purchased angel figurines for a special garden for deceased children called "Baby Land." He carefully painted each angel a hue of brown. He says he wanted the angels to be Black, like many of the children laid to rest here. Cara Anthony/KHN hide caption

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Cara Anthony/KHN

This image shows purified particles of mpox virus, formerly called monkeypox. Viruses like these can be genetically altered in the lab in ways that might make them more dangerous. NIAID hide caption

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NIAID

When is it OK to make germs worse in a lab? It's a more relevant question than ever

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A nurse prepares a syringe of a COVID-19 vaccine at an inoculation station in Jackson, Miss., in 2022. An advisory committee for the FDA voted Thursday to simplify the country's approach to COVID vaccination. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP
Joy Ho for NPR

Your kids are adorable germ vectors. Here's how often they get your household sick

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Gel nail polish is popular for its durability, but needs to dry under a UV light. A new study raises questions about the potential health risks of those devices. StockPlanets/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

6 doctors swallowed Lego heads for science. Here's what came out

As an emergency physician at Western Health, in Melbourne, Australia, Dr. Andy Tagg says he meets a lot of anxious parents whose children have swallowed Lego pieces. Much like Andy so many years ago, the vast majority of kids simply pass the object through their stool within a day or so. But Andy and five other pediatricians wondered, is there a way to give parents extra reassurance ... through science?

6 doctors swallowed Lego heads for science. Here's what came out

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Islenia Milien for NPR

To reignite the joy of childhood, learn to live on 'toddler time'

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New guidance calls for lower lead levels in food for babies and children under 2. Lead exposure can be harmful to developing brains. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty

The FDA proposes new targets to limit lead in baby food

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Worshipper in front of stained glass windows of Prayer Hall, Nasir-al Molk Mosque, Shiraz, Iran. James Strachan/Getty Images hide caption

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James Strachan/Getty Images

Some Muslim Americans Turn To Faith For Guidance On Abortion

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George Mink Jr. is a health care outreach worker in Delaware County, Pa. He worries about what will happen when vaccines are no longer paid for by the federal government. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY) Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

6.8 million expected to lose Medicaid when paperwork hurdles return

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Licensed vocational nurse Denise Saldana vaccinates Pri DeSilva, associate director of Individual and Corporate Giving, with a fourth Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster at the Dr. Kenneth Williams Health Center in Los Angeles, Nov. 1, 2022. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

The FDA considers a major shift in the nation's COVID vaccine strategy

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Since the Dobbs decision in June, clinics providing abortions in what are now restrictive states have had to reinvent what they do. Shannon Brewer, pictured here in 2019 at the Jackson Women's Health Organization, now runs a clinic in Las Cruces, N.M., where abortion is legal. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

50 years after Roe v. Wade, many abortion providers are changing how they do business

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Abortion-rights protesters shout into the Senate chamber in the Indiana Capitol on July 25, 2022, about a month after Roe was overturned, in Indianapolis. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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