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Illustration of an overactive bladder, a condition where there is a frequent feeling of needing to urinate, sometimes with loss of bladder control leading to urge incontinence. KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images hide caption

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KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images

Why The Bladder Is Number One!

When's the last time you thought about your bladder? We're going there today! In this Short Wave episode, Emily talks to bladder expert Dr. Indira Mysorekar about one of our stretchiest organs: how it can expand so much, the potential culprit behind recurrent urinary tract infections and the still-somewhat-mysterious link between the aging brain and the aging bladder.

Why The Bladder Is Number One!

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Few large grasslands remain intact. Though they play a huge role in limiting the effects of climate change, they are threatened and tend to have few protections. Tracy Kressner hide caption

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Tracy Kressner

Families gather in a playground with a splash pad and swings in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. Philadelphia has multiple projects underway to make this and other large parks in the city more resilient to heat and other effects of climate change. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

This illustration shows the DART spacecraft approaching the two asteroids, Didymos and Dimorphos, with a small observing spacecraft nearby. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben hide caption

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Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

The Library of Congress has acquired the life's work of radio producer Jim Metzner, who has spent decades traveling the world to capture rich soundscapes. While he's honored that they will be archived, he says he wants to make sure people actually listen to them. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

He spent decades recording soundscapes. Now they're going to the Library of Congress

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Asteroid Didymos and its moonlet Dimorphos are not a threat to Earth, but because they do pass relatively close to Earth, so they were chosen as the target for NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test mission. The redirect technology could one day be used to deflect asteroids on a collision course with our home planet. NASA JPL DART Navigation Team hide caption

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NASA JPL DART Navigation Team

Asteroid Deflection Mission, Activate!

In movies, asteroids careening towards Earth are confronted by determined humans with nuclear weapons to save the world! But a real NASA mission wants to change the course of an asteroid now (one not hurtling towards Earth). The Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, launched in 2021 and on Monday, September 26, 2022, makes contact with the celestial object. In 2021, NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce talked about what it takes to pull off this mission and how it could potentially protect the Earth in the future from killer space rocks, and that's what you'll hear today. And stay tuned - when NASA has the results of contact in a few weeks, Short Wave will bring Nell back to tell us all about it!

Asteroid Deflection Mission, Activate!

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A view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and turbulent southern hemisphere was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft in 2019. NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill

A woman from the Ho-Chunk Nation smiles as she touches the canoe. Wisconsin Historical Society maritime archaeologists recovered a 3,000-year-old dugout canoe from Lake Mendota in Madison, Wis., on Thursday. Wisconsin Historical Society hide caption

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Wisconsin Historical Society

A late Triassic-era rausuchian, one of the rival reptile lineages who lost out to the dinosaurs. Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons

Charles F. "Chuck" Sams III is the first Native American director of the National Park Service. He's working to facilitate US government collaboration with tribes on managing public lands. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Working With Tribes To Co-Steward National Parks

In the final episode of Short Wave's Summer Road Trip series exploring the science happening in national parks and public lands, Aaron talks to National Park Service Director Charles Sams, who recently issued new policy guidance to strengthen the ways the park service collaborates with American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes, the Native Hawaiian Community, and other indigenous peoples. It's part of a push across the federal government to increase the level of tribal co-stewardship over public lands. Aaron talks with Sams, the first Tribal citizen to head the agency, about how he hopes this will change the way parks are managed, how the parks are already incorporating Traditional Ecological Knowledge, and what national parkland meant to him growing up as a member of the Cayuse and Walla Walla tribes on the Umatilla Indian Reservation in eastern Oregon.

Working With Tribes To Co-Steward National Parks

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Sean Murphy, lead author of a new malaria vaccine study, demonstrates how participants got their dose: by placing an arm over a mesh-covered container filled with 200 mosquitoes whose bites delivered genetically modified malaria parasites. Annette M Seilie hide caption

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Annette M Seilie

A runner takes a quick drink during training at the Australian Athletics Olympic Teams training camp at Nudgee College in Brisbane, Australia. Darren England/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren England/Getty Images

Water Water Everywhere, But How Much Do You Really Need?

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Simply improving our breathing can significantly lower high blood pressure at any age. Recent research finds that just five to 10 minutes daily of exercises that strengthen the diaphragm and certain other muscles does the trick. SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR

Daily 'breath training' can work as well as medicine to reduce high blood pressure

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A pharmacist prepares to administer COVID-19 vaccine booster shots during an event hosted by the Chicago Department of Public Health at the Southwest Senior Center on September 09, 2022 in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

How Biden's declaring the pandemic 'over' complicates efforts to fight COVID

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In October 2016, in Kigali, Rwanda, nations around the globe agreed to phase out a category of dangerous greenhouse gases widely used in refrigerators and air conditioners. In 2022, the U.S. took steps to formally ratify the agreement. Cyril Ndegeya /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cyril Ndegeya /AFP via Getty Images

Karen Douthitt (left) found she does not carry the rare genetic mutation for early-onset Alzheimer's dementia, but her older sister June Ward (right) does carry it. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR

Three Sisters And The Fight Against Alzheimer's Disease

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People wait in line for food in Sindh province, Pakistan, on Sept. 19, 2022. The province was one of the hardest hit by recent deadly floods. A new analysis confirms that climate change likely helped cause the disaster. Pervez Masih/AP hide caption

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Pervez Masih/AP