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Of the many species the scientists photographed aboard the RV Investigator, the deep-sea batfish made one of the biggest splashes across social media. Benjamin Healley / Museums Victoria hide caption

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Benjamin Healley / Museums Victoria

Scientists discover fantastical creatures deep in the Indian Ocean

Yi-Kai Tea, a biodiversity research fellow at the Australian Museum in Sydney, has amassed a social media following as @KaiTheFishGuy for his sassy writing and gorgeous photos of fish and other wildlife.

Scientists discover fantastical creatures deep in the Indian Ocean

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Asteroid 2023 BU will streak about 2,200 miles above the Earth's surface on Thursday night. Its path is seen here in an image from NASA's Scout impact hazard assessment system. The moon's path is in gray. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

6 doctors swallowed Lego heads for science. Here's what came out

As an emergency physician at Western Health, in Melbourne, Australia, Dr. Andy Tagg says he meets a lot of anxious parents whose children have swallowed Lego pieces. Much like Andy so many years ago, the vast majority of kids simply pass the object through their stool within a day or so. But Andy and five other pediatricians wondered, is there a way to give parents extra reassurance ... through science?

6 doctors swallowed Lego heads for science. Here's what came out

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ICARDA lab employee Bilal Inaty cuts a lentil plant in order to test it for various diseases at the ICARDA research station in the village of Terbol in Lebanon's Bekaa valley, on Dec. 21, 2022. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

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Dalia Khamissy for NPR

How ancient seeds from the Fertile Crescent could help save us from climate change

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Islenia Milien for NPR

To reignite the joy of childhood, learn to live on 'toddler time'

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The directors of Everything Everywhere All At Once credit their "math brain" for this genre bending story, about laundromat owner Evelyn Wang (Michelle Yeoh) battling for the fate of the multiverse. A24 hide caption

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A24

Boats are pushed up on a causeway after Hurricane Ian passed through the area on September 29, 2022 in Fort Myers, Florida. Research suggests support for some climate policies increases immediately after climate-driven disasters such as Ian. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

An artist's reconstruction of adult and newly born ichthyosaur, Shonisaurus popularis, which lived during the Triassic Period. Gabriel Ugueto / Smithsonian hide caption

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Gabriel Ugueto / Smithsonian

Fossil CSI: Cracking the case of an ancient reptile graveyard

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Abortion-rights protesters shout into the Senate chamber in the Indiana Capitol on July 25, 2022, about a month after Roe was overturned, in Indianapolis. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Kylee Gray, a ranger with the Queensland Department of Environment and Science, holds a giant cane toad on Jan. 12 near Airlie Beach, Australia. The toad weighed 5.95 pounds. Queensland Department of Environment and Science via AP hide caption

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Queensland Department of Environment and Science via AP

The ROSA machine allows surgeons to zero in on areas of the brain tied to seizures, and guides a surgical arm precisely to the target. University of California, San Diego hide caption

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University of California, San Diego

Flat, light rocks like the ones pictured above are favored for skipping stones A new study has found that heavier rocks can also skim the water's surface. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Study shows heavy stones may give big leaps in water — plus real-world implications

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Sibley Street, along with other residential roads were closed due to flooding from recent rain storms resulting in high water levels in Willow Creek, in Folsom, California. Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources

California's flooding reveals we're still building cities for the climate of the past

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Jazz saxophonist Joshua Redman plays in 2019. Swing is an essential component of nearly all kinds of jazz music. Physicists think that subtle nuances in the timing of soloists are key to creating that propulsive swing feel. Bernd Thissen/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Bernd Thissen/picture alliance via Getty Image

What makes that song swing? At last, physicists unravel a jazz mystery

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