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SpaceX founder Elon Musk during a T-Mobile and SpaceX joint event on August 25, 2022 in Boca Chica Beach, Texas. Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images

Texts released ahead of Twitter trial show Elon Musk assembling the deal

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eBay former Senior Director of Safety and Security James Baugh arrives for his sentencing in a cyber stalking case at Moakley Federal Court on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022, in Boston. Lane Turner/AP hide caption

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Lane Turner/AP

Afghan money changers count banknotes at the currency exchange Sarayee Shahzada market in Kabul in 2015. Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

The financial web connecting Afghanistan, the US, and Switzerland

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A commercial building sits empty Sept. 19 in Citrus Heights, Calif., northeast of Sacramento. Two new laws in California will let developers bypass local governments to build housing on commercial land. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

President Jimmy Carter signs an emergency natural gas legislation in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., in 1977. ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Memories of the 1970s haunt the Fed, pushing its aggressive rate moves

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After Frankie Cook's car accident on a wet road outside Rome, Ga., her father, Russell (right), got a lawyer's letter saying they owed a hospital emergency room more than $17,000 for scans and an exam to see if she had a concussion. Audra Melton for KHN hide caption

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Audra Melton for KHN

They were turned away from urgent care. The reason? Their car insurance

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When it comes to fighting inflation, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has said, "We will keep at it until we are confident the job is done." Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Financial markets are a mess around the world. Fingers are pointing at the Fed

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Dan Charles / NPR

The miracle apple (Classic)

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The mighty US dollar (Encore)

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Bed Bath & Beyond is working on yet another turnaround after a series of crises and missteps. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Will Bed Bath & Beyond sink like Sears or rise like Best Buy?

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Aerial view of downtown Fort Worth, Texas. Some hospitals in Texas and around the U.S. are seeing high profits, even as their bills force patients into debt. Of the nation's 20 most populous counties, none has a higher concentration of medical debt than Tarrant County, home to Fort Worth. Jupiterimages/Getty Images hide caption

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Jupiterimages/Getty Images

Eastbound traffic crowds Interstate 275 as people evacuate before the arrival of Hurricane Ian in Tampa, Fla., on Tuesday. Ricardo Arduengo /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo /AFP via Getty Images

Florida's population has skyrocketed. That could make Hurricane Ian more destructive

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Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says the Biden administration has plans to help the economy absorb supply shocks. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Why tackling climate change means a stronger economy — according to Janet Yellen

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U.S. officials have announced fraud charges against three men who, they allege, orchestrated a scheme to inflate the market value of the company that owned Hometown Deli, a small delicatessen in New Jersey. In this photo illustration, a person views online information for the now-shuttered deli. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Instead of going back to a corporate job, Farida Mercedes started her own business. It pays less, but she has more flexibility to spend time with her sons Sebastian (left) and Lucas, ages 7 and 9. Farida Mercedes hide caption

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Farida Mercedes

Women are returning to (paid) work after the pandemic forced many to leave their jobs

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Is your new CEO a liability?

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A Nissan electric vehicle recharges at a Power Up fast charger station on April 14, 2022, in Pasadena, Calif. California has more chargers than any other state in the U.S., but the federal government is trying to expand charger access across the country. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A Steag coal power plant in Herne, Germany, on Aug. 25. The Essen-based energy company Steag wanted to convert the old coal-fired power plant Herne 4 into a gas-fired power plant at the beginning of the year. In March, Steag decided to postpone the conversion and to continue firing the old power plant with coal. Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images

Social media company Meta's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. The Facebook parent company says it has removed a Russian network pushing a pro-Kremlin view of the war in Ukraine and a Chinese network targeting the U.S. midterm elections. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Montana health officials are seeking to increase oversight of nonprofit hospitals amid debate about whether they pay their fair share. The proposal comes nine months after a KHN investigation found that some of Montana's wealthiest hospitals, such as the Billings Clinic, lag behind state and national averages in community giving. Lynn Donaldson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Lynn Donaldson/Bloomberg via Getty Images